Mile2 Cybersecurity Certifications

Cybersecurity Certifications

OCU C)NP A Week 01 Lesson 01 Discussion

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    • #66121
      Jessica Jagerson
      Keymaster

      Provide a troubleshooting process and the reason why you would approach the networking problem in that manner.

    • #89672
      Ashly Jackson
      Participant

      When you begin troubleshooting, check all hardware to ensure it is properly connected, powered on, and functioning. If a cable is loose or someone turned off an important router, that could be the cause of your network problems. Merely connecting cables is of no use when troubleshooting network issues. Make sure all switches are in the correct position and have not been accidentally hit. Then power cycle the hardware. This is the heart of IT troubleshooting, and although it seems simple, it can often actually solve problems. You may be able to fix a simple problem by turning your modem, router, and PC off and on again. However, leave each device powered off for at least 60 seconds before turning it on again. If possible, reproduce the problem on test hardware or software. This will help you know what the problem is. Interview users on your network to learn more about errors and issues they encounter. Identify symptoms of network failure. Maintenance troubleshooting typically follows a systematic four-step approach. Resolve problems by identifying problems, planning responses, and testing solutions. Steps 1 through 3 are often repeated several times before a solution is found.

      • #89708
        Amy Hastings
        Participant

        Amazingly worded and described. I agree that these are the steps and is what troubleshooting is, as I put some connection in mine as yours has. You did great giving the information and explaining the process.

    • #89706
      Aaron Elliott
      Participant

      For networking problem solving I would start with the physical layer first, also known as the bottom-up approach. Starting from the bottom of the OSI model would allow me to verify any simple errors quickly, like comparing the suspect device with another to see if the problem persists, or simply powering the device on and off again. Following the OSI model cables would be checked for damage or being unplugged. If no issues were found physically, ports and software would be looked into next. Once the issue is found, figuring out how the problem occurred and try to recreate the problem to verify. To avoid any lengthy trial and error a plan to fix the solution would be made testing full functionality is restored. Documentation will need to be made on how the problem occurred and what steps were taken to correct the issue.

      • #89735
        Ashly Jackson
        Participant

        Perfectly written about troubleshooting process and the reasons in understanding way. Troubleshooting initially looks for common, known causes. For example, when a laptop does not boot up, an obvious first step is to check whether the power cable is working. Once common issues are ruled out, troubleshooters must run through a checklist of components to identify where the failure is happening.

    • #89707
      Amy Hastings
      Participant

      If you want to troubleshoot your device or computer there is always a few things you need to do first to prepare for it. First you should make sure that your computer is plugged into an outlet with good energy, and check that your wires are all in good condition. If you are having issues with your computer such as a blurred screen, bad connection or loading slowly you should restart the computer or turn it off then back on before troubleshooting, if this don’t work, then troubleshoot. If you troubleshoot it, it helps you find the problem and will explain how to solve the issues. This is also why you need to tell your problem exactly how it is for a better solution.

      • #89757
        jmontgomery2
        Participant

        This is a very sound methodology for troubleshooting. Determining the wires are all connected and the machine is receiving adequate power are two of the most common fixes for information technology related problems. In addition, the classic turn it off and back on again method is a surefire way to clear out minor one off bugs. This could fix almost anything from slow performance to a webpage not loading because of a driver or download that is not running smoothly.

    • #89756
      jmontgomery2
      Participant

      The troubleshooting process I would use would be to first recreate the problem if possible and run the order operations on a different device. After that I would try to move parts of the problem device over to identify if the issue lies in the software or hardware of the specific machine. Using the move a long method would make it easier to determine exactly where the problem lies and allows me to use the divide and conquer method to locate the issue. While this is a fancy way to describe having a gut feeling about t he problem, this method works quite well. This is especially true when you are familiar with the particular machine or software that is experiencing trouble. If you are not as familiar with the system or machine in question a linear method similar to the top to bottom of bottom to top method would be more applicable. If the problem is software based, the bottom up method would be more efficient in locating the root. The inverse is true if the problem is hardware based and you need to service a component of the machine on site.

      • #89775
        Aaron Elliott
        Participant

        In my past work experience trouble shooting is a skill that benefits a person in general and not just IT. Countless times when trouble shooting a tool, would the method of swapping tools to see if the problem persists is a common but effective strategy. Also, documentation is critical since you cannot, and probably do not want to be available all the time, other associates will need to know how you fixed past issues. This way productivity can be spent on better options, other than putting out old fires.

    • #89771
      Joseph Doss
      Participant

      When troubleshooting always start with the simplest checks first (ex. if you have network connection issues is your router on) Check if the device or devices are properly connected to power and powered on. If so check you other connections (if network issue check your Ethernet cable or WiFi, if it’s a video issue check your monitor connection and so on) depending on your case and escalate upward into more advanced testing until you find the issue, of course tanking into account what COULD be the issue (If you keyboard isn’t working don’t check your mouse for issues) anything that could not be the issue can be automatically ruled out before continuing further.

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